Green Infrastructure for Coastal Resilience Workshop


Event Details


Introducing Green Infrastructure for Coastal Resilience

December 12, 2013

9:30am – 4:30 pm

David Brower Center, Kinzie Room

741 Allston Way

Berkeley, CA 94710

A workshop sponsored by the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and NOAA Coastal Services Center. 

Green Infrastructure incorporates the natural environment and constructed systems that mimic natural processes in an integrated network that benefits nature and people. A green infrastructure approach to community planning helps diverse community members come together to balance environmental and economic goals.

Workshop Description

This day-long workshop will include a morning introductory course and afternoon panels by local experts.

The morning course, led by NOAA Coastal Services Center staff, will introduce participants to the fundamental green infrastructure concepts that play a critical role in making coastal communities more resilience to natural hazards. Through lectures, group discussion, and exercises, participants will identify natural assets in their communities that improve coastal resilience and will identify key stakeholders and planning processes that can support green infrastructure design and protection.

During the afternoon, we will delve into the nuts and bolts of green infrastructure projects in the San Francisco Bay Area. We will hear from local experts who are implementing green infrastructure on the ground at multiple scales, from street projects to watersheds. The afternoon panels will be moderated for lively discussion.

Who Should Attend: City and county officials, Engineers, Floodplain managers, Landscape Architects, NGO’s, Planners, and other Decision Makers involved in Coastal Management Issues

Registration: To register, click here. Registration is limited to 41 participants and is expected to fill fast. The deadline to register is December 6, 2013.

This workshop is being developed in partnership by the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and NOAA Coastal Services Center. In addition, an advisory committee have provided feedback on the training including participants from: San Francisco Estuary PartnershipBay Area Ecosystems Climate Change ConsortiumSan Francisco Bay Conservation and Development CommissionCalifornia Coastal Conservancy and the Bay Institute.

Questions? Contact Heidi Nutters, [email protected], 415-338-3511

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