By Kristine Wong

“The best place for our students to learn about the environment is in their own community.” Emily Koller, who has been teaching conservation and environmental science to fifth graders at Bahia Vista School in San Rafael, works with Point Blue Conservation Science’s STRAW (Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed) to restore a section of wetlands in the student’s own backyard.

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Profile - Emily Koller

By Kristine Wong

“The best place for our students to learn about the environment is in their own community.” Emily Koller, who has been teaching conservation and environmental science to fifth graders at Bahia Vista School in San Rafael, works with Point Blue Conservation Science’s STRAW (Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed) to restore a section of wetlands in the student’s own backyard.

Read More
About the author

Kristine Wong is an independent multi-media journalist who has worked in environmental justice and public health organizations. She specializes in reporting on green tech, energy, the environment, food, sustainable business, culture, and health.

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