By Cariad Hayes Thronson

After more than a decade of study and planning, the first part of a critical flood protection and environmental project is creeping towards construction near the town of Alviso. The South Bay Shoreline Project will eventually include over four miles of levee, 2,900 acres of restored tidal wetlands, and upgrades to the iconic Bay Trail. While the US Army Corps of Engineers waits on financing, other partners are focused on getting ducks in a row, such as coordinating access with adjacent property owners and communicating with the local community. “It’s to the community’s benefit to get flood protection, but outreach cuts down on complaints,” says the Water District’s Rechelle Blank.

 

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Overdue Levee Almost Shovel Ready

By Cariad Hayes Thronson

After more than a decade of study and planning, the first part of a critical flood protection and environmental project is creeping towards construction near the town of Alviso. The South Bay Shoreline Project will eventually include over four miles of levee, 2,900 acres of restored tidal wetlands, and upgrades to the iconic Bay Trail. While the US Army Corps of Engineers waits on financing, other partners are focused on getting ducks in a row, such as coordinating access with adjacent property owners and communicating with the local community. “It’s to the community’s benefit to get flood protection, but outreach cuts down on complaints,” says the Water District’s Rechelle Blank.

 

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About the author

Cariad Hayes Thronson covers legal and political issues for Estuary News. She has served on the staffs of several national publications, including The American Lawyer. She is a long-time contributor to Estuary News, and some years ago served as its assistant editor. She lives in San Mateo with her husband and two children.

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