This August the California Sun’s Jeff Schechtman interviewed ESTUARY magazine’s editor in chief Ariel Rubissow Okamoto, also a long-time Bay Area science writer, about her personal opinions on the resiliency of the largest estuary on the West Coast, the challenges facing the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, and the potential impacts of climate change and sea level rise on the San Francisco Bay.  Listen to the 20-minute podcast here.

Mentions: Nutrients, Toxics, Giant Marsh, Adaptation Atlas, Resilience, Sea Level Rise impacts, BCDC Art, Oro Loma Horizontal Levee, UC Berkeley, Regional Planning, Franks Tract, Central Delta Corridor, North Delta Arc, State of the Estuary, climate-smart infrastructure and more.

Links to Topics Referenced

Climate Smart Infrastructure for California- Paying it Forward Report

Adapting to Rising Tides Program, SFBCDC

Prepping for Sea Level Rise, Estuary Magazine Story

State of the Estuary Conference October 2019

Supershore at Giant Marsh Multi-Habitat Experiment, Richmond, Estuary Magazine Story and Video

Experimental Levee at Oro Loma, Nudging Natural Magic, Estuary Magazine Story

Franks Tract Futures? California Department Fish & Wildlife

Adaptation Atlas, San Francisco Estuary Institute & SPUR

Measure AA: Going Local Buys Future for Bayshore, Estuary Magazine story

Region’s Nutrient Management Strategy

The Flip on Harmful Algal Blooms: Feds Coastal Research Crew Bucks Headwinds, Estuary Magazine Story

Central Delta Corridor Partnership, Delta Public Lands

MORE READING – Natural History of San Francisco Bay by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto & Kathleen M. Wong

Pearls in the ocean of information that our reporters didn’t want you to miss
2017 March for Science sign
 

California Sun Podcast Interview with ESTUARY's Editor Dives into All Things Bay & Delta on the Front Burner Today

This August the California Sun's Jeff Schechtman interviewed ESTUARY magazine's editor in chief Ariel Rubissow Okamoto, also a long-time Bay Area science writer, about her personal opinions on the resiliency of the largest estuary on the West Coast, the challenges facing the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, and the potential impacts of climate change and sea level rise on the San Francisco Bay.  Listen to the 20-minute podcast here.

Mentions: Nutrients, Toxics, Giant Marsh, Adaptation Atlas, Resilience, Sea Level Rise impacts, BCDC Art, Oro Loma Horizontal Levee, UC Berkeley, Regional Planning, Franks Tract, Central Delta Corridor, North Delta Arc, State of the Estuary, climate-smart infrastructure and more.

Links to Topics Referenced

Climate Smart Infrastructure for California- Paying it Forward Report

Adapting to Rising Tides Program, SFBCDC

Prepping for Sea Level Rise, Estuary Magazine Story

State of the Estuary Conference October 2019

Supershore at Giant Marsh Multi-Habitat Experiment, Richmond, Estuary Magazine Story and Video

Experimental Levee at Oro Loma, Nudging Natural Magic, Estuary Magazine Story

Franks Tract Futures? California Department Fish & Wildlife

Adaptation Atlas, San Francisco Estuary Institute & SPUR

Measure AA: Going Local Buys Future for Bayshore, Estuary Magazine story

Region's Nutrient Management Strategy

The Flip on Harmful Algal Blooms: Feds Coastal Research Crew Bucks Headwinds, Estuary Magazine Story

Central Delta Corridor Partnership, Delta Public Lands

MORE READING - Natural History of San Francisco Bay by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto & Kathleen M. Wong

About the author

Ariel Rubissow Okamoto is both today’s editor-in-chief and the founding editor of ESTUARY magazine (1992-2001). She enjoys writing in-depth, silo-crossing stories about water, restoration, and science. She’s a co-author of a Natural History of San Francisco Bay (UC Press 2011), frequent contributor of climate change stories to Bay Nature magazine, and occasional essayist for publications like the San Francisco Chronicle (see her Portfolio here). In other lives, she has been a vintner, soccer mom, and waitress. She lives in San Francisco close to the Bay with her architect husband Paul Okamoto.

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