From the Palo Alto Sailing Station to the Petaluma Creek Marina, the San Francisco Bay Area Water Trail program has established five maps that unify a network of “trailheads,” allowing boaters to access the entire Estuary. “The goal of the project is to improve and enhance access for non-motorized craft,” says Ben Botkin, Water Trail Planner. The back of each map provides information on the specific ecosystems of each region, serving to inform and inspire boaters to explore the varied waterscapes. “There are so many amazing places to see,” says Botkin, “And we want to educate people on how to do it safely.” The maps are available for download at the new Water Trail website, which also provides up-to-date water condition information and trip-planning functionality. The Water Trail worked with the San Francisco Estuary Partnership and was supported with funding from the State Coastal Conservancy and the North Bay Watershed Association. MA

For the first time, the San Francisco Estuary has been mapped out for non-motorized watercraft.

From the Palo Alto Sailing Station to the Petaluma Creek Marina, the San Francisco Bay Area Water Trail program has established five maps that unify a network of “trailheads,” allowing boaters to access the entire Estuary. “The goal of the project is to improve and enhance access for non-motorized craft,” says Ben Botkin, Water Trail Planner. The back of each map provides information on the specific ecosystems of each region, serving to inform and inspire boaters to explore the varied waterscapes. “There are so many amazing places to see,” says Botkin, “And we want to educate people on how to do it safely.” The maps are available for download at the new Water Trail website, which also provides up-to-date water condition information and trip-planning functionality. The Water Trail worked with the San Francisco Estuary Partnership and was supported with funding from the State Coastal Conservancy and the North Bay Watershed Association. MA

About the author

Michael Hunter Adamson was born and partly raised in the Bay Area and spent his childhood balancing adventure with mischief. As an equally irresponsible adult he has worked for The Nature Conservancy, the arts and education nonprofit NaNoWriMo, taught English in Madrid-based High School equivalent, and volunteers with The Marine Mammal Center. As a writer for Estuary and AcclimateWest, Michael employs his love for nature and his interest in people to help tell the unfolding story of the living Earth.

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